The Long Way Home by Richard Chizmar

43297534._UY400_SS400_Gathered here for the first time ever are seventeen short stories, two essays, and a short script by award-winning and New York Times bestselling author, Richard Chizmar.

Eerie, suspenseful, poignant, the stories in The Long Way Home run the gamut from horror to suspense, crime to dark fantasy, mainstream to mystery. This brand new collection features more than 100,000 words of short fiction, as well as more than 5,000 words of autobiographical Story Notes. Continue reading

The Faithful by Matt Hayward

41irr5knu9L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_At the Mountains of Madness meets They Live! in a new novel from Matt Hayward, the Bram Stoker Award-nominated author of What Do Monsters Fear? After comedian Leo Cartwright performs his farewell comedy show in New York City, a young man ailed by cerebral palsy confides in him about odd dreams and a place he calls No Man’s Land. Leo thinks nothing of it until the man, Christopher Tate, winds up dead, along with a cryptic note taped to the comedian’s RV window: See you soon, Funnyman. Leo sets out to find the truth about Christopher’s dreams to an odd town named Elswich. Shown to Leo in a dream by a mysterious man named Jarrad Prescott, the town prays to an Otherworldly god named Aypep and give their bodies to host his children in return for eternal life in the Otherworld. It’s a wish granted through sacrifice… Continue reading

The Last by Hanna Jameson

40048961BREAKING: Nuclear weapon detonates over Washington

Historian Jon Keller is on a trip to Switzerland when the world ends. As the lights go out on civilisation, he wishes he had a way of knowing whether his wife, Nadia, and their two daughters are still alive. More than anything, Jon wishes he hadn’t ignored Nadia’s last message.

Twenty people remain in Jon’s hotel. Far from the nearest city and walled in by towering trees, they wait, they survive.

Then one day, the body of a young girl is found. It’s clear she has been murdered. Which means that someone in the hotel is a killer.

As paranoia descends, Jon decides to investigate. But how far is he willing to go in pursuit of justice? And what kind of justice can he hope for, when society as he knows it no longer exists? Continue reading

Otherworld by Jason Segel & Kirsten Miller

28238589My first reaction to receiving a review copy of Otherworld was “Great, another novel written by a celebrity”. Although I enjoy most of Segel’s films, I was sceptical about reading this book, even if it is co-written with Kirsten Miller, a leading YA writer in her own right. Otherworld is the fifth book they have collaborated on (the other four are in the Nightmares! series published by Delacorte, which are aimed at middle grade readers). This book, in contrast, is written for an older audience. Continue reading

Cell 7 by Kerry Drewery

29864658The reality TV show to die for. Literally.

Kerry Drewery’s Cell 7, published in September 2016, sounds like an episode of Black Mirror. The public decides whether a person convicted of a serious crime is innocent or guilty via a public vote all broadcast live to the world via a nightly tv show, Death is Justice. The convict must wait seven days on death row during which the public decides their fate. Each day, they move from one cell to the next enduring various psychological tortures all of which are broadcast live. On Day 7, if they are voted guilty, they are executed live on tv, for an extra charge of course. It’s a concept that, like Charlie Brooker’s, isn’t completely unimaginable. Continue reading

Broadswords and Blasters Issue 2

cover2Broadswords and Blasters, the new magazine from Matthew X. Gomez and Cameron Mount, declares itself as “pulp with modern sensibilities” and, before I started reading, I wasn’t really sure what this was going to be. As an incredibly varied genre, pulp encapsulates popular or sensationalist writing that is stereotypically of poor quality. Thankfully, the magazine does feature genre storytelling, all of which is very well written, without the misogynistic and racist elements of the pulp tradition. Continue reading